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Safety, Our Top Mission

New Shepard

Record of Safety

Blue Origin has been flight testing the New Shepard rocket and its redundant safety systems since 2012. The program has had 18 successful consecutive missions including three successful escape tests, showing the crew escape system can activate safely in any phase of flight.

New Shepard Flight History

Escape Test

October 19, 2012

Successful test of the crew escape system from the pad.

NS-1

April 29, 2015

First flight of the New Shepard rocket and successful crew capsule misson.

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NS-2

November 23, 2015

Landing of the first booster in history to fly to space and back.

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NS-3

January 22, 2016

First reuse in history of a booster.

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NS-4

April 02, 2016

Successful re-flight of vehicle.

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NS-5

June 19, 2016

Safe capsule landing with one chute out.

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NS-6

October 05, 2016

Successful test of the crew escape system at maximum dynamic pressure (MaxQ).

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NS-7

December 12, 2017

First flight of next vehicle.

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NS-8

April 29, 2018

Successful re-flight of vehicle.

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NS-9

July 18, 2018

Successful test of crew escape system in space.

Replay

NS-10

January 23, 2019

Successful re-flight of vehicle.

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NS-11

May 02, 2019

Successful re-flight of vehicle.

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NS-12

December 11, 2019

100th payload launch to space.

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NS-13

October 13, 2020

NASA lunar landing sensor demo on outside of rocket; successful re-flight of vehicle.

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NS-14

January 14, 2021

First flight of next vehicle.

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NS-15

April 14, 2021

Second successful flight of vehicle.

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NS-16

July 20, 2021

On July 20, Blue Origin successfully completed New Shepard’s first human flight with four private citizens onboard.

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NS-17

August 26, 2021

Successful re-flight of NASA lunar landing sensor demo on outside of rocket; successful re-flight of vehicle.

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NS-18

October 13, 2021

Blue Origin successfully completed its second human spaceflight with four private citizens on board New Shepard on Wednesday, October 13, 2021.

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Safety Features

Full Envelope
Crew Escape System

Drawing from the Mercury and Apollo programs, New Shepard is equipped with a crew escape system that pushes the capsule away from the booster in the unlikely event an issue is detected. The system has been tested three times successfully from the launch pad, mid-flight, and in the vacuum of space, demonstrating the system can activate safely in any phase of flight. 

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Chutes Out
Redundant Landing Systems

A robust landing safety design with multiple redundancies has been engineered into
the capsule from the beginning and tested throughout the program. The bottom of the capsule has a retro-thrust system that expels a pillow of air so the capsule lands at just 1.6 km/h (1 mph) in the West Texas desert. For added safety and redundancy, the capsule can land with two of its three chutes out, and the seats have been designed to flex and absorb g-forces in the unlikely event of an off-nominal landing. 

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Your Flight To Space & Back

T-35 Minutes

T-35 Minutes

Enter the capsule and buckle up for your flight.

T-0 Minutes

T-0 Minutes

Liftoff!

T+3 Minutes

T+3 Minutes

Weightlessness begins as the capsule separates from the booster.

T+3-5 Minutes

T+3-5 Minutes

Free float in the capsule for several minutes in zero-g, passing the Kármán Line and ascending above 100 kilometers.

T+5 Minutes

T+5 Minutes

Buckle back up for the capsules free-float descent back to Earth under parachutes.

T+7.5 Minutes

T+7.5 Minutes

Booster lands on the pad in West Texas.

T+11 Minutes

T+11 Minutes

Capsule touches down gently as a retro-thrust system creates a pillow of air for a soft landing.

T+21 Minutes

T+21 Minutes

The hatch opens as your guests and CrewMember 7 guides greet you for celebration.